About me

About me
🌿 I've been gardening ever since a child, when I spent time with my father in his vegetable garden. But my fascination with Echeverias started in the 1980's, when my father gave me a pot with five Echeverias, which turned out to be E. imbricata. At first I wasn't much interested in them and planted them in some obscure corner of the garden and completely forgot about them. How great was my surprise when, a couple of months later, I noticed that they had spread and made a beautiful display - I was hooked!
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Friday, 9 September 2016

Succulents flowering in September 2016

The weather has warmed up after a severe and stormy winter and my succulents are celebrating spring!

My Echeveria elegans flowring for the first time!
Echeveria "Lipstick" also flowering for the first time even though it suffered severely from the hailstorm we had

My Echeveria imbricata after the severe hailstorm we had at the end of July - they should all have been plump, beautiful and flowering now

Haworthia cooperii var transiensis -  first flower

Pleiospilos Nelli first Flowers since I acquired her
The Vygies never fail to delight! Mesembryanthemum Lampranthus (Delosperma cooperi)

 As soon as I brought the Rattail cactus outside from indoors where it spent the winter, it started sprouting it's beautiful flowers

The gorgeous flower of the Rattail cactus (Aporocactus-flagelliformis)

 One of my Echeveria imbricata is sporting yellow flowers, a first in the 20-odd years I've been growing them. It is also making a baby along one of the flower stems, I think that is called "sporting".

( A sport in the plant world is a genetic mutation that results from a faulty chromosomal replication. The results of the mutation are a segment of the plant that is distinctly different from the parent plant in both appearance (phenotype) and genetics (genotype). The genetic change is not a result of unusual growing conditions; it is an accident, a mutation. In many cases the new trait can be handed down to the organism’s offspring.)

Read more at Gardening Know How: Plant Sport Mutations – What Does It Mean WhenA Plant “Throws A Sport


A sport in the plant world is a genetic mutation that results from a faulty chromosomal replication. The results of the mutation are a segment of the plant that is distinctly different from the parent plant in both appearance (phenotype) and genetics (genotype). The genetic change is not a result of unusual growing conditions; it is an accident, a mutation. In many cases the new trait can be handed down to the organism’s offspring.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Plant Sport Mutations – What Does It Mean When A Plant “Throws A Sport” http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/plant-sport-mutations.ht
A sport in the plant world is a genetic mutation that results from a faulty chromosomal replication. The results of the mutation are a segment of the plant that is distinctly different from the parent plant in both appearance (phenotype) and genetics (genotype). The genetic change is not a result of unusual growing conditions; it is an accident, a mutation. In many cases the new trait can be handed down to the organism’s offspring.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Plant Sport Mutations – What Does It Mean When A Plant “Throws A Sport” http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/plant-sport-mutations.htm
 Just before the sun gets to it, the Mammillaria's flowers are still closed. This one is now starting to form a very nice ring around the crown.

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